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Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the patterns and distributions of spinal disc degeneration in patients residing in Lagos State

By
Ndianekwute Nkiruka Anne ,
Ndianekwute Nkiruka Anne

Department of Radiography and Radiological Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Anambra State, Nigeria

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Joseph C. Eze ,
Joseph C. Eze

Department of Radiography and Radiological Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Anambra State, Nigeria

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Michael Promise Ogolodom ,
Michael Promise Ogolodom

Department of Radiography, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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Abstract

Background: Degenerative disc disease is a condition in which intervertebral discs losses its structure thereby resulting in loss of cushioning, fragmentation and herniation most times related to ageing. Structural defects and failure are common causes of degenerative disc disease. In some cases, the spine loses flexibility and bone spurs may pinch a nerve root, causing pain or weakness. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of disc degeneration over the spines in patients residing in Lagos state using magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional prospective study conducted among 163 patients presented for spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan due to disc degeneration in some selected radio-diagnostic centres in Lagos State, Nigeria. The spine structural appearance, intervertebral disc structural appearance, signal intensity, pathologies, gender, age, height, weight and BMI of the patients will be recorded. Both descriptive (mean, percentage, charts and frequency) and inferential statistics (Chi-square) statistics were used for statistical analysis with p-value set at 0.05. Results: Out of 163, 96(58.9%) were female while males were 67(41.1%). The age of the study population ranges from 20 years to 90 years with a mean age of 57.17 ± 12.35. Grade V was highest 64 (39.3%) followed by 32 (25.8%) grade IV and least 10 (6.1%) were grade II. The study found the most common affected on L4/L5 disc with 35 (21.5%) adults demonstrating disc degeneration, while 17 (10.4%) adults demonstrated no disc degeneration. There is no statistically significant association between gender and pattern of disc degeneration (χ2 = 5.943, p =0.203). Conclusion: The majority of the patients had the grade V patterns of degenerated discs based Pffirman grading system. The most affected disc was the L4/L5 disc followed by the L3/L4 disc. There were negative correlations but not statistically significant between weight and BMI respectively and patterns of the disc degeneration diseases. There exist positive correlations but not statistically significant between age and height respectively, and patterns of the disc degeneration diseases. There is no statistically significant association between gender and pattern of disc degeneration.

How to Cite

1.
Nkiruka Anne N, Eze JC, Promise Ogolodom M. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the patterns and distributions of spinal disc degeneration in patients residing in Lagos State. Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología - Serie de Conferencias [Internet]. 2024 Mar. 31 [cited 2024 Jul. 20];3:692. Available from: https://conferencias.saludcyt.ar/index.php/sctconf/article/view/692

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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