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Biocalcification of Sandy Gypseous Soil by Bacillus Pasteurii

By
Hadeel S. Sulaiman ,
Hadeel S. Sulaiman

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Anbar, Ramadi, Iraq

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Muayad A. Al-Sharrad ,
Muayad A. Al-Sharrad

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Anbar, Ramadi, Iraq

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Idham A. Abed ,
Idham A. Abed

College of Agriculture, University of Anbar, Ramadi, Iraq

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Abstract

Microbial-induced carbon precipitation (MICP) is one of the most recent treatment methods for soil stabilization. The present work employs this technique in improving the collapsing behavior of sandy gypseous soil with 35% gypsum content under one-dimensional loading to 100 kPa and leaching conditions. A bacterial strain, Bacillus pasteurii was used for this purpose. A set of collapse tests was performed inside a modified oedometer on specimens, prepared with 25% bacterial solution and 0, 0.25M, 0.5M, or 1M cementation solution molarities, cured to 7, 14, or 21 days. The results indicated that the bacterium was able to produce a considerable amount of calcium carbonate ranging from 3% to 15%. This carbonate was also observed by microscopic imaging of the specimens at the interparticle contacts and also on the surfaces of soil grains. Consequently, the soil gained additional bonding and the voids became smaller. Therefore, the soil became more resistant to water flow and leaching, where the treated specimen maintained nearly the same permeability with the progression of leaching, unlike the untreated specimen which showed a 7-fold increase over the same water flow condition. Over the examined load, the MICP treatment provided almost no change in the strains caused by external loading, unlike the wetting strains which exhibited a considerable reduction of 11% to 80%. The results of leaching strains appeared to be sensitive to the rate of flow and the cementation solution molarity

How to Cite

1.
Sulaiman HS, Al-Sharrad MA, Abed IA. Biocalcification of Sandy Gypseous Soil by Bacillus Pasteurii. Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología - Serie de Conferencias [Internet]. 2024 Jun. 2 [cited 2024 Jun. 13];3:818. Available from: https://conferencias.saludcyt.ar/index.php/sctconf/article/view/818

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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